Farewell Brenda Sutcliffe

23 Jan

We remember with affection and admiration, Brenda Sutcliffe, the gallant award-winning campaigner who, with her family, was seriously harmed by an OP pesticide. She died on January 18th.

brenda-award

In the picture above, we also recognise campaigners Tom Rigby (2nd left) and Peter Evans (far right – though not politically) in this picture.

brenda We celebrate Brenda’s vigorous campaigning and know that she would have been most interested in the next article – news of yet another organophosphate concern.

By coincidence a 2013 account of her work was top post this week. On the days her article was visited, the readers came from these countries on the left.

Read more about her work and that of other activists on the Sheep Dip Sufferers website set up by Tom.

 

 

 

It’s time to stop farming salmon

23 Jan

Quartz announces, “Lox lovers and sashimi devotees, prepare to shell out this year. According to the Nasdaq Salmon Index, salmon prices are at historic highs—and it’s all because of one tiny, nefarious little creature.

The culprit behind the rising price of salmon is about the size of an aspirin: a parasite known as the sea louse, or salmon louse. Acute outbreaks in Scotland and Norway this year have, er, eaten into the global supply of farmed Atlantic salmon. Norway, the planet’s biggest salmon producer, exported around 5% less by volume than in 2015. Globally, production fell around 9%.

Mark Macaskill reported in The Times that the use of toxic chemicals on Scottish salmon farms to fight sea lice has soared in the past decade, according to official data. Between 2006-16, farmed salmon production increased by 35% while the use of toxic chemicals to control flesh-eating lice rose 932%.

salmon-sea-lice

The sea louse is a parasite that kills millions of farmed fish every year cause serious fin damage, skin erosion and deep open wounds that are prone to infection. 

The latest figures, obtained under freedom of information from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), show that Scottish salmon farms used 45kg of chemicals in 2006 but this increased to 467kg in 2016. Since 2002, nearly four tonnes of chemicals have been dumped into the seas around Scotland

“Scottish salmon farming is fighting a losing battle against chemically resistant sea lice,” said Don Staniford of the Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture. “The drugs don’t work anymore.

Treatments used by Scottish salmon farms included cypermethrin, a pesticide that was abandoned in 2012 after sea-lice developed resistance. Scientific studies have suggested that it impairs fertility in wild salmon. SEPA records also show that just over two tonnes of azamethiphos, an organophosphate insecticide  has been used in the past decade by salmon farmers. A paper published last month by scientists in Canada raised concern that azamethiphos poses a serious health risk to marine wildlife; tests on lobsters found repeated exposure can impair the nervous system and cause death.

Efforts are underway to reduce the use of chemicals to control sea lice. Scottish Sea Farms, one of the country’s leading producers of farmed salmon, recently bought a Thermolicer, a £4m delousing device. Fish are pumped into the machine and pass through heated water that kills the lice. Quartz reports, “the scalding-hot bath kills off the sea lice—and also, sometimes, the fish themselves. Last year, salmon-farming giant Marine Harvest inadvertently cooked 95,000 caged salmon with a thermolicer. Though that killed 95% of the sea lice, it also left the company with 600 tonnes of dead salmon to incinerate. Along with rampant salmon deaths from pesticide treatments, the thermolicer incident caused a 16% drop in the company’s Scottish salmon output for 2016”.

Just before Christmas, Salmon & Trout Conservation Scotland called for some of Britain’s leading supermarkets to ban the sale of farmed salmon from parts of Scotland where sea lice infestations are “rampant” and pose a threat to the survival of wild salmon and sea trout.

 

 

 

Pesticide concerns – but better news from France and America

6 Jan

Some time ago Richard Bruce, whose health has been profoundly damaged by pesticides, highlighted the lack of reference to “the poisons that are added to the wheat AFTER harvest, in the food grain stores and during processing”.

He continues: “Here in the UK tons of the poisons have been admixed with wheat, barley, oats and other food crops every year for decades, often with no withholding times after treatment at all. The EU intervention stores demanded that the grains were protected from insect infestation by these products for at least 5 years in store … Bakers have refused delivery of clean wheat unless it is treated with the poisons”.

peschemhealthRichard pointed out that though the British Medical Association stated in the publication ‘Pesticides, Chemicals and Health’ * (use link below) that wholemeal bread contained the highest residues of the poison – 24 years later it is still approved for use in our food and NEVER appears on the food content labels because it does not have to be declared.

The official reason? Because it is classed as a pesticide and not a food additive. 

Recently he wrote that science is not true science now. It is controlled by vested interests. Corporate pseudo-science rules over all. Dangers are played down, or even totally dismissed, so as to ensure greater profitability. He continued:

“Over the years, I had to contact various “experts’ at universities and even had some insects I found eating barley roots sent to the British Museum to discover what they were. I don’t know much but I was astounded by how little those “experts” really knew and I have been very wary of experts ever since. I once asked a veterinary surgeon if he could test to see what poison had been injected into an egg which had obviously been left in a row of soon to be baled straw to tempt a predator. He actually told me that I would need to know the name of the poison before he could test it – and left me with that poisoned egg! I was angry about it at the time – a completely illegal act ignored – a portent of what was to happen to me!”

mark-purdeyHe recalled speaking with the late Mark Purdey (right). The Guardian recorded that Mark’s life changed one day in 1984 when an official from the Ministry of Agriculture (MAFF, as it then was) told him he had to comply with a warble fly eradication order and treat his herd of Jersey cows with an organophosphate (OP) pesticide. “When she arrived, it was as if my whole life became focused,” he explained. “Prior to that, I knew what was happening in farming, and I was concerned, but I hadn’t been actively campaigning.”

Purdey refused, arguing that the suggested dose was far too high and in any case his natural treatment for warble fly was perfectly effective. The battle lines with the agricultural bureaucracy were drawn; before they had a chance to prosecute him, Purdey took MAFF to court and shook administrative complacency by winning his case.

He suggested to Richard that modern farmers have been treated rather like the Hitler Youth – indoctrinated into dependence on chemical inputs and forcing the land into submission from birth. They know no different and are reluctant to change. This coupled with the induced fear of crop and livestock losses through disease convinces them never to change.

Richard ends: “If my efforts to gain justice and truth through the courts taught me anything it is that none of the experts can be trusted. It appears to me that too many of them simply repeat what they are taught and told without ever checking the facts for accuracy. We see it all the time, even when the claims made have been proven to be false”.

Better practice

beer-sheva-park

Above: Beer Sheva Park in Washington State: read more here, http://www.beautifulwashington.com/king-county/parks/seattle/south-seattle/273-beer-sheva-park.html

Seattle (Washington State USA) is one of 17 American states to have “pesticide free parks”. It has fourteen, maintained by Seattle Parks and Recreation department without the use of any pesticides since 2001. IPM practices are used and their parks are not overrun with fire ants or other pests. Read in more detail here. The program is now being expanded to include eight more parks and about 25 more acres, making a total of 22 parks and about 50 acres distributed geographically throughout the city which provide citizens with an opportunity to use these facilities with the knowledge that no pesticides are used.

And in France on 29th December it was reported that pesticides will be banned in all France’s public green spaces and non-professional gardeners will no longer be able to buy pesticides over the counter. The pesticide ban covers public forests, parks and gardens, though local authorities are still allowed to use pesticides in cemeteries. The new law also stipulates that pesticides will be prohibited in private gardens from 2019.

 

*https://www.cabdirect.org/cabdirect/abstract/19922316043

Hawaiian parents and environmentalists campaign against use of harmful sprays

7 Dec

In 2015 an American Academy of Pediatrics’ report, Pesticide Exposure in Children, found “an association between pesticides and adverse birth outcomes, including physical birth defects”. Local schools had been evacuated twice and children sent to hospital because of pesticide drift.

aerial-spray

Years earlier, whilst in America, a friend of the writer, who was in good health at the time, developed emphysema and died prematurely after being exposed to spray drift.

Carla Nelson, a pediatrician, pointed out that doctors need prior disclosure of sprayings: “It’s hard to treat a child when you don’t know which chemical he’s been exposed to.” Read her Guardian coverage here.

In the state legislature in Honolulu, Senator Josh Green, who then chaired the health committee, made his fourth attempt to curb pesticide and herbicide spraying, but ruefully commented that most heads of the agriculture committee have had “a closer relationship with the agro-chemical companies than with the environmental groups”.

A year later, Time magazine reported that there was growing evidence of glyphosate’s potentially dangerous health effects. It was judged a “probable human carcinogen” by the World Health Organization last year but despite this, on the Hawaiian island of Maui and elsewhere, sprayers simply sprayed and moved on; no one monitored the observance of the safety directions of their own product.

spray-hackneyHawaii environmentalists have used a little-known law, FIFRA, short for the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, which requires sprayers to follow the safety instructions on the product’s label down to the letter.

For products containing the herbicide glyphosate, that means keeping people away from the area where the product has been used for four hours after applications for agriculture, or until the product dries when sprayed for non-agricultural purposes. That can be difficult in places like long stretches of roads and highways where extended monitoring to keep people away from recently sprayed areas is virtually impossible.

Parents began to circulate photographs of government employees spraying Round Up, the primary commercial product containing glyphosate. Footage showed authorities spraying on highways, roads and near schools without any visible effort to keep people away.

Finally the uncertainty raised by activists over the labelling issue convinced Stephen Rodgers, who oversees pesticide application on Maui’s state highways to switch to organic pesticides. His department no longer purchases Roundup and will stop using the product entirely – but only when the existing supply has been used.

Significant exposure to glyphosate in farm workers has been linked to increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a type of cancer. Nature magazine, which is sceptical of the impact on human health, at least reports a study showing a link between glyphosate and cancer in mice. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a branch of the World Health Organization (WHO), ruled last year that the pesticide is a “probable human carcinogen.”

Dr. Philip Landrigan, a Harvard-educated pediatrician and epidemiologist, Dean for Global Health at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, says, “For a long time glyphosate was viewed as an innocuous herbicide. A lot of things have changed”.

His colleague, Chuck Benbrook, an adjunct professor at Washington State University’s crops and soil science department, said “There is growing evidence that glyphosate is geno-toxic and has adverse effects on cells in a number of different ways. It’s time to pull back … on uses of glyphosate that we know are leading to significant human exposures while the science gets sorted out.”

Part 2: studies which conclude that glyphosate does not cause harm.

 

 

 

Causes of diseases are already well-known –  but nothing is done to remove those causes

28 Nov

Richard Bruce recently sent an email reflecting on the Queen’s opening of the £700 million Francis Crick Institute (below), which will have some £130 million in annual funding. Its aim is to find new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat conditions such as cancer, heart disease and stroke, infections and neurodegenerative conditions like motor neurone disease. It is the biggest research building under one roof in the entire European Union employing some 1500 scientists and staff.

francis-crick-institute_19_cwellcome-images-copy 

He asks: “Do they need all that money to re-discover what they already know?”

The Medical Research Council (MRC), Cancer Research UK, Wellcome, University College London, Imperial College London and King’s College London are involved.  Richard comments: “Some interesting names there with staff who must know what is really going on” and summarises his post examining what the MRC actually knew and what it has reported over the decades.

The Francis Crick Institute in London is said to be “a world-leading centre of biomedical research and innovation, it has scale, vision and expertise to tackle the most challenging scientific questions underpinning health and disease.

The aim is to find new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat conditions such as cancer, heart disease and stroke, infections and neurodegenerative conditions like motor neurone disease.”

Richard’s post states that the cause of these illnesses is already well-known and has been known for a very long time but nothing is done to remove those causes. He says that protecting the poisons industry seems to be the real aim: “Poisoned people earn the industry £millions in drug sales and research”.

He asks, “Why is the Medical Research Council now implying that it does not understand the ever present danger not only to the occupationally exposed but to everyone, adult, child and unborn, exposed as we are in our food, clothes, furniture, fuels, paints, oils and our environment?”

And comments: “Shocking really”.

Richard Bruce who has an extensive knowledge on the effects of organophosphates which are used far more widely in agriculture than just sheep dip. He personally was badly affected by Actellic used in grain stores documented at: Trouble in Store 

 

 

 

Professor McGlade: current political systems have become ‘silted up by vested interests and a determination to protect assets’

3 Nov

Richard Bruce has drawn our attention to an article in the Telegraph with the headline ‘Modern life is killing our children’.

denis_henshawSarah Knapton, Science Editor of the Telegraph, reported that new analysis of government statistics by researchers at the charity Children with Cancer UK found that there are now 1,300 more cancer cases a year compared with 1998, the first time all data sets were published – a 40% rise.

Dr Denis Henshaw (above left), Professor of Human Radiation Effects at Bristol University, the scientific adviser for Children with Cancer UK, said many elements of modern lifestyles are to blame:

  • air pollution was by far the biggest culprit
  • obesity,
  • pesticides
  • solvents inhaled during pregnancy,
  • circadian rhythm disruption through too much bright light at night,
  • radiation from x-rays and CT scans,
  • smoking during and after pregnancy,
  • magnetic fields from power lines,
  • magnetic fields from gadgets in homes,
  • and potentially, radiation from mobile phones.

Diagnoses of colon cancer among children and young people has risen 200% since 1998, while thyroid cancer has doubled. Ovarian and cervical cancers have also risen by 70% and 50% respectively. The charity estimates that the rise in cases now costs the NHS an extra £130 million a year compared with 16 years ago.

Children with Cancer UK is not calling – as Mr Bruce observes – for any of these carcinogens to be removed; it has decided to launch a five-point plan calling on the Government and the science and medical community to ensure that all children diagnosed with cancer in the UK have access to precision medicine by 2020.

prof-mcgladeProfessor Jacqueline McGlade is Chief Scientist and Director of the Division of Early Warning and Assessment of the United Nations Environment Programme. She said in her preface to Late lessons from early warnings: science, precaution, innovation that well-informed individuals and communities would ‘more properly’ set ‘the power to act’, than current political systems which have become ‘silted up by vested interests and a determination to protect assets’ – and, we would add, to accumulate profits. She calls for “a more ethical form of public decision-making based on a language in which our moral instincts and concerns can be better expressed . . .”

Note on a sister site: https://chssachetan.wordpress.com/2016/11/02/sjm-protecting-the-interests-of-food-producers-the-indian-environment-and-people/

SJM: protecting the interests of food producers, the Indian environment and people

The latest in the GM food saga: a correspondent sends news from Hyderabad about the discovery of imported American GE sweets confirmed by State Food Laboratory’s Ravindra, who states that “The sale of GE foods is prohibited under Section 22 of the Food Safety and Standards Act.

Today the focus is on the role of the Swadeshi Jagran Manch, who – like many others – are advocates of the swadeshi approach, described by Satish Kumar as a program for long term survival – read more here.

 

 

 

 

Will consumers be able to boycott purveyors of fluoridated water?

21 Oct

In April next year, all businesses and charities in England will be able to choose their water provider. Though the quality of the water would not improve, changing suppliers would be a gesture of support for companies that do not practice enforced medication with a neurotoxin.

It is said that this choice is likely to be extended to the residential sector after water regulator OFWAT has backed plans to bring competition to the residential retail water market and made these recommendations to the government. According to a report, the move, which would end the final retail monopoly, could be worth almost £3bn to the consumer with smaller bills and improved customer service.

welsh-waterThe writer would choose the only British-owned utility, Welsh Water – Dwr Cymru – a semi-mutual water company run on a not-for-profit basis, owned by the co-operative Glas Cymru, a single purpose company with no shareholders run solely for the benefit of customers.

Fleur Jones of Dwr Cymru’s Legal Departmentconfirms that Welsh Water does not fluoridate its water supplies.

She explains: “The Water Act 2003 amends the Water Industry Act 1991 which now states that water companies must follow the instruction of the Health Authority or in Wales, the Welsh Assembly Government. It does not now give the green light to water companies to fluoridate but means that, as stated above, the decision making process sits with those directly accountable to their local population. In practice in Wales this is likely to mean that decisions will rest with the National Assembly for Wales. Dŵr Cymru Welsh Water do not fluoridate any of our water supplies and we have not received any indication that the National Assembly for Wales intend to ask us to fluoridate any water supplies”.

Hats off to Welsh Water – who are avoiding the range of suspected health risks from fluoride – see research published in the BMJ which found higher levels of hyperthyroidism in the fluoridated West Midlands.